Violence in West Bengal over the panchayat elections

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By Leena Uppal
 
There is an article in the HT (attached) about the violence in West Bengal over the panchayat elections. The article makes a quick reference to the panchayat election process in India and it has highlighted that anyone with more than 2 kids cannot stand as a candidate for panchayat elections, referring to Andhra Pradesh. 
It was ironic for me to read that despite the fact that the report focuses on West Bengal, the writer had made sure to make a reference to the two-child restriction in elections picking it from another state. Also, the report on panchayat election process did not go clear without making a reference to the two-child restriction.  

This rampant reporting of the norm in an un-thoughtful way leaves the readers with no scope of thinking that this restriction has rendered communities in India vulnerable and doubly disadvantaged. 

Almost every day, readers are bombarded by population control rhetoric in the media without any specific mention to the dis-empowering nature of the current population control policies and policy prescriptions.
 
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About coalitiontcn

The Coalition on Two Child Norm and Coercive Population Policies is a group of individuals and organisations interested in addressing the issue of coercive population policies pushed by different states in India, especially the Two Child Norm (TCN). The recent examples of attempts to impose the TCN have come from states like Kerala, Maharashtra, Bihar. Activists including organisations and individuals from various states have expressed interest in a need for a Coalition that will anchor advocacy with the state governments to (a) prevent them from implementing the norm where it is not yet implemented but proposals towards the same have been expressed in public (b) advocate for removal of TCN through and build evidence to highlight its negative implications in states where it is already implemented. The Coalition is hosted at Centre for Health and Social Justice (CHSJ, New Delhi).

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